Posts Tagged Bats as mosquito predators

Happy Valentine’s Day from Dread Skeeter

Happy Valentine's Day from Dread

Dread Skeeter, the mosquito eliminator, wishes you a Happy Valentine's Day

Guest Blogger: Dread Skeeter, the mosquito eliminator

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, the day of chocolates, flowers and hearts; the perfect day to tell those you care about that you love them. As I’m sure all of you know, I love kids and pets and do my best to protect them against annoying mosquitoes, ticks and the dangerous diseases they spread. Along with the rest of my Mosquito Squad, a number of people and animals help me on my quest to Fight the Bite. In the spirit of Valentine’s Day, I want to tell them I love them.

Bill Gates. I love you for donating $750 Million to help fighting malaria, a preventable and curable disease that kills a child every minute in Africa.

The Praying Mantis. You may be difficult for me to see in the wild, with all that green and all, but I love you for preying on mosquitoes that may come too near.

Dragonflies. One of your favorite meals is the mosquito during your short life and I love you for doing your part while you can.

Christine Rampone. I love the captain of the US Women’s Soccer not only for kicking butt on the field, but for being the newest face of Lyme disease. It just goes to show that Lyme disease doesn’t discriminate.

Bats. I love you for your massive eating skills, eating between 600 and 1,000 insects per hour! You greatly reduce the number of mosquitoes around to bite us people.

The tick eating Guinea-fowl

The tick eating Guinea-fowl

Mosquito Fish and Mosquito Crustaceans. You save us from ever seeing a number of mosquitoes as you prey on them in their larval phase before they hatch as adults. I love you for that.

Guinea Fowls. You’re weird looking birds, but I love you for the service you provide. Finding and eating ticks in the wild stops those buggers from spreading Lyme disease.

Happy Valentine’s Day to all of you.

Ugh, enough of that mushy stop, let’s go kill those pests!

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Among “skeeter eaters” the bat reigns supreme

Dread Skeeter Mosquito Control

Dread Skeeter of Mosquito Squad

The bat is a familiar image used to evoke fear and creepiness throughout the year and especially during the Halloween holiday. The infamous vampire bat is used to emulate a shape shifting capability that the vampires of Hollywood have become famous for. But even though we think of the bat as an icon of  o-hallows-eve, the bat is as beneficial as it is spooky. Bats like many other birds, fish and mammals live primarily off  of a diet of insects, and among those insects on the bat’s menu is the mosquito.

This photo shows a bat catching an insect

This photo shows a bat catching an insect

Bats are broken down into two suborders, megabats  and microbats.  Megabats primarily feed off of fruit nectar and pollen while microbats feed on insects. Microbats  are considered to be a mosquito predator and can greatly reduce the number of mosquitoes that are likely to feed off of us as well as infect us with the diseases that they harbor. Bats come out to feed at dusk or right after dark and can eat a whopping 600 to 1,00 insects per hour. This is a substantial amount considering that the population of bats within a fusion can measure into the thousands. When you isolate a single bat eating mosquitoes it doesn’t paint the whole picture as accurately as taking the number of bats feeding off mosquitoes and other insects in one isolated area can.

The bat can eat between 600 and 1,000 bats in a single hour

The bat can eat between 600 and 1,000 bats in a single hour

Contrary to popular belief bats are not blind. Their eyes are quite small and underdeveloped, therefore the bat uses their heightened senses of hearing in order to locate and catch their prey. The bat uses a high-pitched sound that only other bats can hear and when the echoes from this sound hit an insect or another animal the echoes from their sound will bounce back off the prey and lead them to it. This incredible process is called echolocation.

Microbats begin hunting and feeding on their own at around 6-8 weeks of age, and a single microbat can live up to 20 years.  Research has indicated that if bats were to become extinct the insect population would explode at an alarming rate putting all of us at a greater risk for  insect-borne illnesses and diseases. A group of one thousand bats can eat up to  four tons of insects in a years time, this is proof positive that bats play a crucial role in keeping insect populations down and keeping us safer by doing so.

No Mosquitoes

No Mosquitoes

Next time you see a bat at dusk quickly darting through the twilight skies at breakneck speed, take into consideration just how much good that little creature is doing  for us by reigning supreme as a natural mosquito predator. As a society we should think of the bat as the crown prince of mosquito control instead of an icon of the prince of darkness.

We thought our barrier control mosquito and tick prevention was pretty good by lasting 2-3 weeks with one barrier spray to your yard. Well, outside of bats, barrier spraying your yard is the next best thing.

Visit our Mosquito Squad website to learn more about our safe and effective mosquito and tick control programs. Or, look at our location list for a mosquito and tick control location near you.

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