Archive for category EEE

Eastern Equine Encephalitis on the Rise

Horses from Kentucky to Maine are being infected and dying from Eastern Equine Encephalitis. Veterinarians across the country encourage all horses not only be vaccinated, but receive booster shots.

Is your horse at risk for Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Is your horse at risk for Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Eastern Equine Encephalitis, or EEE, is a mosquito-borne virus that was first found in the 1830s in Massachusetts when 75 horses died from the disease. EEE does not only affect horses. Humans can become sick from the disease as well. After a human is infected by a mosquito bite, he or she will begin to display symptoms within 10 days normally. Symptoms include fever, muscle pain, headaches and seizures to name a few. There is no vaccine or cure for humans and the fatality rate is 35%.

Those areas of the country, namely in New England, that have confirmed human cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis, have started spraying for mosquitoes.

While the human fatality rate due to EEE is 35%, the equine fatality rate starts at 70% and can go as high as 90%. Horses begin to display symptoms between 7 to 21 days after infection. One nickname for EEE is the sleeping sickness due to the way horses behave when they have it. The first symptoms of the disease are usually a high fever and bursts of excitement or nerves. As it gets more serious and brain lesions begin, horses will look drowsy, their ears will droop and they will walk around aimlessly. Paralysis ultimately sets in and it can die within a few days of paralysis.

The most recent case to hit the news was of a horse in Maine that died from EEE despite having the vaccine. The sad story highlights the importance of six month booster shots for EEE. The initial inoculation consists of two vaccines 4 to 6 weeks apart. After the adult horse has been vaccinated, it will need booster shots before any mosquito season. In areas where EEE is a problem, it is suggested to administer the booster every six months.

The EEE virus can only be transmitted to humans and horses through the bite of an infected mosquito. Humans, for example, cannot get it from a horse that is battling EEE.

As municipalities take action and administer more public mosquito spray, we at Mosquito Squad encourage homeowners, and horse owners to consider professional mosquito control.

The majority of our residential clients use the mosquito control barrier spray to protect their property. Our trained technicians come out to the home every three weeks to spray the areas where mosquitoes are known to feed and harbor. The spray itself will kill adult mosquitoes on contact and then provide that protection for up to three weeks.

For properties with horse stables, we suggest an installed mosquito misting system instead of the barrier spray. Instead of having a technician come and spray every three weeks, a system is installed on your property. Two to three times a day, when the mosquitoes are known to be their most active, a short burst of mosquito spray will emit from the system, protecting the area. If they are particularly bad, there is a button you can press for another short spray. Mosquito systems are a great way to keep the mosquitoes away on larger properties. Mosquito Squad will not only install the system, but come back to fill your product when needed and winterize your system at the end of the season.

If you have any questions on how to protect yourself and your horses from mosquitoes and the dangerous disease they can transmit, please contact your local Mosquito Squad office.

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Springtime is the Right Time to Vaccinate Horses

It’s the first day of spring which means budding flowers and, unfortunately, mosquitoes are right around the corner. As 2012 brought an influx of mosquito-borne disease, for humans and animals alike, now is the perfect time to protect your pets from the dangerous diseases that they often carry.

Mosquito Squad protects horses from mosquitoes and ticks

Keep your horse from being at risk of contracting EEE

Horses are particularly vulnerable to West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). EEE, or Triple E, was first found in Massachusetts in the 1830s when 75 horses died. After an infected mosquito transmits the disease, the horse usually starts showing signs of a fever within one to three weeks and lasts for a couple days. The sick horses will then show more serious signs of drowsiness, drooping ears and wandering as the disease spreads to the brain. Between 70 and 90% of horses with Triple E will eventually die from it.

Horses are not only susceptible to Eastern Equine Encephalitis but also West Nile Virus, however most horses will recover from West Nile. Symptoms of West Nile include fever, convulsions and more.

There are currently no treatments for horses that have been in infected with mosquito-borne illnesses, however there are vaccinations to prevent them from becoming sick. Springtime is the perfect time to ask your veterinarian to vaccinate your horse. “Horse owners have made significant investments in their horses, financially, and emotionally,” says Hoyt Cheramie, DVM, MS, Dipl. “Helping protect their health and well-being with an appropriate vaccination schedule is best decision when the alternative is to cope with losing a horse or treating a horse for a preventable disease.” Source.

At Mosquito Squad, we urge home and pet owners to protect themselves and their beloved animals from the dangers that mosquitoes and ticks can bring. Our mosquito control misting system is our most popular mosquito service for horse farms or stables. The automatic misting system is an installed mosquito system that sprays two to four times a day(for about 30 seconds) when mosquitoes are known to be the most active. The spray kills any adult mosquitoes and ticks on contact and continues to repel the pests in all treated areas.

mosquito-control-misting

The mosquito control misting system’s nozzles are installed in areas where mosquitoes are known to feed and harbor

The misting system is installed using environmentally friendly nylon tubing that connects to the stainless steel nozzles which are place sporadically around the perimeter of the property. They can be run and installed underground or along fences. The tubing connects to the drum and pump of the mosquito misting system that is most often placed near the home or stable. Mosquito Squad will come out and refill the drum any time more product is needed and to winterize it as the weather turns cool. If you have a particularly bad mosquito problem, the mosquito misting system can come with a remote that you can use for additional (or fewer) sprays.

If you have a large property, especially one that houses animals, and a mosquito problem you would like to address, contact your local Mosquito Squad office. They will walk you through your mosquito control options and what will work best for you and your property.

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Does Municipal Mosquito Spraying Protect You?

2012 is shaping up to be the worst year ever for mosquito-borne diseases. More deaths in the U.S. this year have been attributed to West Nile than ever before and this week brings the first confirmed death by EEE in Massachusetts. With all of the confirmed cases of vector-borne diseases, more municipalities are taking action and spraying for mosquitoes, but does it work?

Dead mosquito - Mosquito Squad kills mosquitoes dead

Dead mosquito – Mosquito Squad kills mosquitoes dead

With 2 deaths and 30 confirmed cases of West Nile, Rankin County in Mississippi is ramping up their mosquito control efforts by having sprayers run double shifts in hopes to cut down on the number of mosquitoes. Additionally, larvacide is being added to standing water to stop mosquitoes from maturing. Many municipalities like Rankin are doing this all across the country.

In Massachusetts, a man recently died of EEE, a mosquito-borne disease even though his town is sprayed by the county. “The spraying reduces the number of mosquitoes, but it doesn’t kill all the mosquitoes and it doesn’t penetrate into heavily wooded areas where the spray trucks can’t get,” says Board of Health Director Paul McNulty.

So what does this mean for homeowners? Even though your county sprays the area generally it may not get all the areas where mosquitoes breed and harbor. More protection, whether it’s a mosquito spray that you spray on yourself or a barrier spray for your yard, may be needed. That’s where Mosquito Squad comes in.

Mosquito Squad applicators spray our effective mosquito control in all the areas that truck sprayers can’t, mainly in your backyard where you spend the majority of your time outdoors. We pay special attention to heavily wooded areas where mosquitoes hide. The spray kills the skeeters on contact and then provides a residual effect for up to 21 days, killing between 85 and 90% of the mosquitoes in your yard.

If you are interested in mosquito control for your yard, contact your local Mosquito Squad office.

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Protect your Horses from EEE

Horse owners are being advised to vaccinate all of their horses against Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) as the disease has appeared in several areas of the east coast. News this week has reported that mosquitoes, chicken and birds have been testing positive for EEE with one horse in New York dying from the disease.

Mosquito Squad protects horses from mosquitoes and ticks

Keep your horse from being at risk of contracting EEE

Encephalitis in general is a vector-borne (mosquito transmitted) disease that causes the brain to swell. Symptoms are common with other brain injuries including headache, confusion and drowsiness. Eastern Equine Encephalitis was first discovered in the US in Massachusetts after seventy-five horses died unexpectedly. Scientists were first able to isolate it in a horse brain in 1933 and were able to eventually create vaccinations for horses.

While human cases of EEE are rare, it can infect mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. Mosquitoes contract the disease from birds and then infect other animals through future bites. Currently there is no cure for EEE.

Horses are very susceptible to EEE as they spend a lot of time outdoors in the presence of potentially dangerous mosquitoes. When bitten by an infected mosquito, a horse won’t show any signs of the disease until 3 weeks later, allowing the virus to do most of its damage. The first sign of EEE is a high fever that lasts for only a few days. After that, horses may appear drowsy, with bursts of excitement and restlessness. They will wander aimlessly and could become paralyzed. Unfortunately 70 to 90% of infected horses will die only a few days after they first displayed symptoms of the disease.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis is a preventable disease when the horses are properly vaccinated. Please visit the American Association of Equine Practitioners for vaccination recommendations. At Mosquito Squad, we have helped many barn and horse owners take the extra step of horse protection with our misting system which provides the area with continuous mosquito and tick control around a property.  If you’re interested in learning how a misting system can help protect your horses against mosquito bites, feel free to give your local Mosquito Squad a call.

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The Culiseta melanura mosquito is putting the elderly at risk for Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Dread_versions2

Learn the 5 "T's" in mosquito prevention and tell those mosquitoes "bite me"

Most people think that EEE, Eastern Equine Encephalitis, is a disease that only strikes equine such as horses, ponies, mules and donkeys. Though in most cases humans are not at as great a risk of contracting EEE, those with compromised immune systems and health problems, especially among the elderly, are at a higher risk of contracting the illness. EEE is characterized by causing swelling of the brain, although some who  become infected will be asymptomatic. Those older individuals that become infected with the virus are more vulnerable to experiencing the more severe side of EEE than most. Early symptoms of EEE  are headache, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, cyanosis, convulsions and coma.

What is EEE?

EEE or Eastern Equine Encephalitis is a virus that is spread through the bite of a mosquito carrying the virus. The virus is maintained between a cycle of the mosquito and a bird, and some cases is passed onto what is called a dead-end host such as an equine or a human. Dead end hosts mean that the virus can not be passed any further once it has reached this host.  Although many mosquito species are known vectors of the virus the Culiseta melanura mosquito has raised the alarm among states with high reports of EEE, especially among elderly residents and those that are immune compromised. Approximately one-third of all human EEE infections prove fatal.

culista melanura

Culiseta melanura

Who is the Culiseta melanura mosquito?

This mosquito can be found from Canada all the way into Florida and is unique in the way in which it is able to reproduce. Culiseta melanura are cold adapted and  have the ability to over-winter their larva until the warm temperatures of spring cause them to awake and begin their vicious cycle of feeding and spreading disease. This mosquito lays its eggs in stagnated pools and wherever water accumulates in quantities of 30 to 300 eggs at one time. This mosquito can reside in a variety of places from old tires, rotting trees to wetlands. Just like other mosquito species the male primarily feeds off nectar, and the female’s feed off blood from unwitting hosts.

Mosquito_Squad_spraying_your_yard

Mosquito Squad spraying your yard to guard against mosquitoes and mosquito-borne illnesses.

What can I do  to prevent getting EEE?

The most important way to avoid possible infection is to make sure you don’t get bitten, because the mosquito that bites you could possibly be carrying EEE. Avoid potential mosquito infested areas, make sure to inspect your yard and areas around you home on a regular basis to keep standing water from becoming a nursery for mosquitoes. This particular species of mosquito loves moist areas.  Mosquito Squad has developed a helpful way to keep your property safe from mosquitoes by using a system called the 5 T’s of mosquito control. These helpful hints will keep standing water and areas that are prone to accumulated moisture to a minimum, when inspecting your property don’t overlook areas like gutters, and the crevices in outdoor furniture for they make perfect breeding grounds  for mosquitoes if filled with debris or moisture. You can learn more about the 5 T’s and other helpful hints by visiting http://mosquito-control-blog.com/2011/06/13/the-five-ts-in-mosquito-prevention/

The 5 T’s of mosquito control are:

  • Tip
  • Top
  • Turn over
  • Tarps ( remove)
  • Toss

If you are unable to thoroughly inspect your property yourself, then ask a loved one or friend to check the areas surrounding your home for you.

No Mosquitoes

No Mosquitoes

Another way to aid in protecting yourself is to have your yard treated by a licensed professional to kill and prevent mosquitoes that may possibly be lurking. Mosquito Squad offers a full-service mosquito control program from automatic mosquito misting systems to our safe and effective barrier sprays, both of which protect you and your family all season long from the Culiseta melanura and other species of mosquitoes as well.

Contact Mosquito Squad to learn more 877-667-7823  http://www.mosquitosquad.com/

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Good Horse Sense- the Risk of Eastern Equine Encephalitis is on the Rise

Is your horse at risk for Eastern Equine Encephalitis?

It is not just man’s best friend and your furry feline who are at risk for mosquito-borne illness’s. Many of our beloved pets are at risk to contract deadly diseases from the mosquito, this includes our horses. If you are a horse owner or horse lover who enjoys the company of a gallant steed like I am, then you need to be aware of the dangers that mosquitoes can bring to you and your horse.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis is spread by simple mosquito bites and can be fatal to our beloved horses. Eastern Equine Encephalitis is also referred to as “sleeping sickness” among veterinarians and horse folk. It was first recognized in 1831 when 75 horses died in Massachusetts from the illness. This virus was first isolated from the brain of a horse infected with EEE ( Eastern Equine Encephalitis ) ,in 1933 and in 1938 the first confirmed human cases of the disease were identified when 30 children perished as the result of the illness in the northeastern United States.

Symptoms of EEE are usually noticeable about 5 days after a horse has been bitten by an infected mosquito. Initially the horse will seem depressed and become quiet. Other signs include impaired vision, aimless circling and wandering even when stalled, an irregular staggering gait, head pressing and rubbing, an inability to swallow, paralysis, convulsions and eventually death.

Since humans can be infected with Eastern Equine Encephalitis as well, Symptoms in humans infected with the illness may include high fever, chills, sudden onset of a headache and vomiting, disorientation, seizures and coma.

Mosquito Squad protects horses from mosquitoes and ticks

Keep your horse from being at risk of contracting EEE

There is no specific treatment for EEE in humans or in equine, care is based on symptoms. So the best treatment is prevention of mosquito bites. Bites can be prevented by reducing the number of mosquitoes in the area. There are a couple of solutions for your horse stables and pastures. In your pasture, Mosquito Squad provides a mosquito barrier spray. This is a safe and effective spray that eliminates 90% or more of the mosquitoes and ticks from the area. It is sprayed every 3 weeks throughout the heavy mosquito season. Mosquito Squad also offers a mosquito misting system. Read this story about our misting system installed in a barn in Nashville.

The illness is rare in humans and common sense safeguards reduce your chance of being bitten by an infected mosquito. Have a licensed professional apply a mosquito barrier spray to your outdoor living areas is a good idea to avoid being bitten.

Even though the illness is rarely seen in humans, the numbers of our equine friends being infected is on the rise. Horses, donkeys, mules and ponies are all at risk of this deadly illness. The threat is real and horse owners need to educate themselves on preventing the illness. Fortunately, there is an EEE vaccine for equine now available. Since there is no treatment for a horse already infected with the illness, vaccinations are essential for the prevention of the disease. The vaccination is given in two doses 30 days apart, and a booster given every six months. These are preferably administered in the early spring through the early fall. Talk to your veterinarian about the appropriate vaccination schedule for your horse.

Dread Skeeter from Mosquito Squad

Dread Skeeter from Mosquito Squad fights mosquito and tick bites

Prevention of mosquitoes is also key in keeping your equine healthy. Safe stabling practices and eliminating sources of standing water in the barn, paddocks and pasture is essential. This includes moist hay or grain, open containers and water troughs.

Simple safeguards and knowledge should be exercised from your backyard to the stable in order to keep you and your horse happy and healthy. Give Mosquito Squad a call, when can make good “horse sense” out of keeping mosquitoes away. 877-667-7823.

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